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266752 Albert Treadwell 2018‑10‑11 Re: OldTools Digest, Vol 158, Issue 12
Are we doing Galootaclaus this year?

    On Thursday, October 11, 2018, 4:02:18 PM EDT, oldtools-request@s...
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Today's Topics:

  1. Fare thee well (Dave Leader)
  2. Can't resist old scissors (Bill Ghio)
  3. Re: Can't resist old scissors (Ed Minch)
  4. Re: Fare thee well (curt seeliger)
  5. Re: Can't resist old scissors (John Ruth)
  6. Re: Finishing Question? (yorkshireman@y...)
  7. Re: Finishing Question? (Patrick Olguin)
  8. Re: Can't resist old scissors (scott grandstaff)
  9. Re: Finishing Question? (yorkshireman@y...)
  10. Re: Can't resist old scissors (Mike Rock)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 08:35:28 -0400
From: Dave Leader 
To: undisclosed-recipients: ;
Subject: [OldTools] Fare thee well
Message-ID: <84e725a7-7359-4eb0-ea5d-0579575d2d87@c...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8; format=flowed

Galoots and SCA members,

In case you haven't heard, Peter Barclay, Master Terafan Greydragon, was 
killed by lance. Unfortunate, to say the least, but somehow seemly.

http://www.newser.com/story/265786/medieval-re-enactor-speared-by-own
-lance.html

Dave in Fairfax


------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 10:26:55 -0400
From: Bill Ghio 
To: OldTools List 
Subject: [OldTools] Can't resist old scissors
Message-ID: <5772B933-99E6-4646-9498-91EF8A42BBA2@m...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

Drives my wife nits because we have scissors all over the house. All users, I
just stick them in various drawers. It is just that when i see a good pair of
vintage scissors for a buck or two I can?t leave them laying there. This wee i
found a small pair of Osborne scissors. Didn?t even know they made scissors. The
catalogs I found on-line suggest they are Bent Trimmers for the upholstery
trade. But, the ones in the vintage catalogs are not this small. These are a tad
under 7 inches and the catalogs show 8 inches and up. Logo and handle design are
also different. I figure the logo should be a clue to dating them. Any ideas?

htt
ps://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../sets/72157674374867208 

Bill

------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 10:50:52 -0400
From: Ed Minch 
To: Bill Ghio 
Cc: OldTools List 
Subject: Re: [OldTools] Can't resist old scissors
Message-ID: <444669F7-77AD-4527-B553-829CD04565A9@a...>
Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=utf-8

That would drive me nits too.  How does this look, for rug hooking, punch needle
& applique, whatever that is:

https://www.cottagehouseprimitives.com/products/bent-handle-
scissors <https://www.cottagehouseprimitives.com/products/bent-handle-
scissors>


Ed Minch




> On Oct 11, 2018, at 10:26 AM, Bill Ghio via OldTools  wrote:
> 
> Drives my wife nits because we have scissors all over the house. All users, I
just stick them in various drawers. It is just that when i see a good pair of
vintage scissors for a buck or two I can?t leave them laying there. This wee i
found a small pair of Osborne scissors. Didn?t even know they made scissors. The
catalogs I found on-line suggest they are Bent Trimmers for the upholstery
trade. But, the ones in the vintage catalogs are not this small. These are a tad
under 7 inches and the catalogs show 8 inches and up. Logo and handle design are
also different. I figure the logo should be a clue to dating them. Any ideas?
> 
> h
ttps://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../sets/72157674374867208 <https://www.
flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../sets/72157674374867208>
> 
> Bill



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 08:02:14 -0700
From: curt seeliger 
To: daveldr@c..., OldTools List 
Subject: Re: [OldTools] Fare thee well
Message-ID:
    
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

 > In case you haven't heard, Peter Barclay, Master Terafan Greydragon, was
> killed by lance. Unfortunate, to say the least, but somehow seemly.

No, but that's well on the radars of several of us here. I can't quite
envision the mechanics involved, but can feel for the people who love him
as well as those nearby. Condolences on your losses.


------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 17:20:54 +0000
From: John Ruth 
To: Bill Ghio 
Cc: "oldtools@s..." 
Subject: Re: [OldTools] Can't resist old scissors
Message-ID:

    
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="Windows-1252"

Bill,


IMHO the "scissors problem" is similar to the "saw problem!"  Both are rooted in
the fact that "They just don't make them like that anymore!"  This drives one to
acquire them "While you still can."


Regarding traditional methods of scissors manufacture in the golden age of
British cutlery, the late Ashley Isles wrote "There is nothing easy about
scissors."  (This is in Isles book "Memories of a Sheffield Toolmaker" )  He
wrote of scissors makers finishing the interior of the handles by stringing
multiple pairs on an abrasive band and then mounting the band on a pair of
wheels in the manner of a band sander.


Regarding having "too many" scissors stashed around the house: It's better to
have a pair handy and not need it than to go across the house to fetch one when
all you want to do is snip a loose thread on your shirt tail.


John Ruth

________________________________
From: OldTools  on behalf of Bill Ghio via OldTools

Sent: Thursday, October 11, 2018 10:26:55 AM
To: OldTools List
Subject: [OldTools] Can't resist old scissors

Drives my wife nits because we have scissors all over the house. All users, I
just stick them in various drawers. It is just that when i see a good pair of
vintage scissors for a buck or two I can?t leave them laying there. This wee i
found a small pair of Osborne scissors. Didn?t even know they made scissors. The
catalogs I found on-line suggest they are Bent Trimmers for the upholstery
trade. But, the ones in the vintage catalogs are not this small. These are a tad
under 7 inches and the catalogs show 8 inches and up. Logo and handle design are
also different. I figure the logo should be a clue to dating them. Any ideas?

htt
ps://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../sets/72157674374867208

Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
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aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
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To change your subscription options:
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tools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

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ot/

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------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 18:23:34 +0100
From: "yorkshireman@y..."
    
To: Bill Ghio 
Cc: OldTools List 
Subject: Re: [OldTools] Finishing Question?
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=utf-8

I?d hate to sound like a certain Pddy O?Deen, but shellac is your friend.  

Brush some on, with the work horizontal.  It will flow into everywhere and both
tie down the the loose stuff and give a sterile quick drying finish.  Repeat as
needed.  IF you want to knock back the shine, acquire some pumice powder (Sharp
edged, fine graded output of volcanos, Paddy)
Place said powder in a coarse muslin bag, made by taking up a square of muslin
with powder piled in the centre and tying with a bit of string.

Shake the bag over the work to shower with powder.  Use the other muslin scrim
to rub the sharp pumice powder over the areas to knock back the shine as much as
you want.  practice on scrap.

Richard
Yorkshireman Galoot, in Northumberland, visiting the deep south of Herefordshire

> On 10 Oct 2018, at 02:18, Bill Ghio via OldTools  wrote:
> 
> My wife had a concept: An old door or such as a headboard for the guest room
bed. No longer a concept. We now have two shutters to be re-programmed. Old
shutters. Probably early 19th C. Hand forged hardware. Big honkin? strap hinges.
Square pegs in round holes. Paint that will probably fry your brain.
> 
> I scrubbed them w/ TSP today and got all the debris & loose stuff off. They
will need a finish to seal them up tight. All I can think of is shellac or
poly.Don?t want it to be too bright. Dull and flat is best.
> 
> Suggestions?
> 
> Bill
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
> 
> To change your subscription options:
> > https:/
/oldtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
> 
> To read the FAQ:
> > https://swingleydev.com/a
rchive/faq.html
> 
> > OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.
com/ot/
> 
> OldTools@s...



------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 17:49:01 +0000 (UTC)
From: Patrick Olguin 
To: "yorkshireman@y..." ,
    Bill Ghio 
Cc: OldTools List 
Subject: Re: [OldTools] Finishing Question?
Message-ID: <532804038.8369160.1539280141491@m...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Hey,I resemble that! An alternate method of flatting shellac is to use steel
wool, or scotch brite (a trade name, alas, not a type of whiskey, Richard) pad,
lubricated with mineral oil or kerosene (paraffin, to Yorkshiremen), and rub
gently, after the shellac has tried for a few days.
Best regards,PaddyO

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Thursday, October 11, 2018, 10:23 AM, yorkshireman@y... 
wrote:

I?d hate to sound like a certain Pddy O?Deen, but shellac is your friend.? 

Brush some on, with the work horizontal.? It will flow into everywhere and both
tie down the the loose stuff and give a sterile quick drying finish.? Repeat as
needed.? IF you want to knock back the shine, acquire some pumice powder (Sharp
edged, fine graded output of volcanos, Paddy)
Place said powder in a coarse muslin bag, made by taking up a square of muslin
with powder piled in the centre and tying with a bit of string.

Shake the bag over the work to shower with powder.? Use the other muslin scrim
to rub the sharp pumice powder over the areas to knock back the shine as much as
you want.? practice on scrap.

Richard
Yorkshireman Galoot, in Northumberland, visiting the deep south of Herefordshire

> On 10 Oct 2018, at 02:18, Bill Ghio via OldTools  wrote:
> 
> My wife had a concept: An old door or such as a headboard for the guest room
bed. No longer a concept. We now have two shutters to be re-programmed. Old
shutters. Probably early 19th C. Hand forged hardware. Big honkin? strap hinges.
Square pegs in round holes. Paint that will probably fry your brain.
> 
> I scrubbed them w/ TSP today and got all the debris & loose stuff off. They
will need a finish to seal them up tight. All I can think of is shellac or
poly.Don?t want it to be too bright. Dull and flat is best.
> 
> Suggestions?
> 
> Bill
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
> 
> To change your subscription options:
> > https:/
/oldtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
> 
> To read the FAQ:
> > https://swingleydev.com/a
rchive/faq.html
> 
> > OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.
com/ot/
> 
> OldTools@s...

------------------------------------------------------------------------
OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.

To change your subscription options:
https://old
tools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

To read the FAQ:
https://swingleydev.com/archi
ve/faq.html

OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.com/
ot/

OldTools@s...




------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 11:24:38 -0700
From: scott grandstaff 
To: porch 
Subject: Re: [OldTools] Can't resist old scissors
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed

OMG you are so brave Bill!!

 ??? I secretly know I may be the worst, but was always shy about 
confessing it. haahah

Upstairs, downstairs, outside in the sheds,
 ?pegs and racks,........ but drawers hide them best. ;)

 ?From the teensiest "hangnail" shears (I had to grind my own I don't 
think anyone ever made them)
To big un's!! Paperhanger shears with 16" blades and tailor shears that 
weight 4 pounds, roaching shears where the whole shear is curved into an 
arc.
 ? Only ones I never had a chance at and wanted. Bench shears 4' long!

 ? All of the greatest collections were founded on what few people 
wanted at the time.
Collecting what everyone else already wants, is suicide.
 ??? yours scott


-- 
*******************************
    Scott Grandstaff
    Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
    scottg@s...
    http://www.snowcrest.n
et/kitty/sgrandstaff/
    http://www.snowcr
est.net/kitty/hpages/index.html



------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 20:04:01 +0100
From: yorkshireman@y...
To: Patrick Olguin 
Cc: Bill Ghio , OldTools List
    
Subject: Re: [OldTools] Finishing Question?
Message-ID: <848E45F8-003B-4007-A464-650C4581B7E7@y...>
Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=utf-8

Bah, humbug,  

Don?t listen to all that newfangled  steel wool and scotch nonsense.  Use the
sharp volcano dust..

No, really, Any of the methods to knock back the high gloss of shellac will
work.  Personally, I avoid steel wool, because a lot of what i do is oak, and
tiny steel dust particles  do not mix with oak.  (Sometime later they reveal
themselves as rust spots)  I use scotch brite, but it steadily goes blunt (as
does steel wool)
Hence - volcano dust.  


R

with thanks to Paddy for making me consider why I ?always? do the same thing.




 
> On 11 Oct 2018, at 18:49, Patrick Olguin mailto:paddyolguin@y...>> wrote:
> 
> Hey,
> I resemble that! An alternate method of flatting shellac is to use steel wool,
or scotch brite (a trade name, alas, not a type of whiskey, Richard) pad,
lubricated with mineral oil or kerosene (paraffin, to Yorkshiremen), and rub
gently, after the shellac has tried for a few days.
> 
> Best regards,
> PaddyO
> 
> > Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone <https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/?.src=iOS>
> 
> On Thursday, October 11, 2018, 10:23 AM, yorkshireman@y... <mailto:yorkshireman@y...> mailto:yorkshireman@y...>> wrote:
> 
> I?d hate to sound like a certain Pddy O?Deen, but shellac is your friend.  
> 
> Brush some on, with the work horizontal.  It will flow into everywhere and
both tie down the the loose stuff and give a sterile quick drying finish.
Repeat as needed.  IF you want to knock back the shine, acquire some pumice
powder (Sharp edged, fine graded output of volcanos, Paddy)
> Place said powder in a coarse muslin bag, made by taking up a square of muslin
with powder piled in the centre and tying with a bit of string.
> 
> Shake the bag over the work to shower with powder.  Use the other muslin scrim
to rub the sharp pumice powder over the areas to knock back the shine as much as
you want.  practice on scrap.
> 
> Richard
> Yorkshireman Galoot, in Northumberland, visiting the deep south of
Herefordshire
> 
> > On 10 Oct 2018, at 02:18, Bill Ghio via OldTools mailto:oldtools@s...>> wrote:
> > 
> > My wife had a concept: An old door or such as a headboard for the guest room
bed. No longer a concept. We now have two shutters to be re-programmed. Old
shutters. Probably early 19th C. Hand forged hardware. Big honkin? strap hinges.
Square pegs in round holes. Paint that will probably fry your brain.
> > 
> > I scrubbed them w/ TSP today and got all the debris & loose stuff off. They
will need a finish to seal them up tight. All I can think of is shellac or
poly.Don?t want it to be too bright. Dull and flat is best.
> > 
> > Suggestions?
> > 
> > Bill
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> > aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> > value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> > traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
> > 
> > To change your subscription options:
> > https:/
/oldtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools <https://oldtools.swingleydev.com/m
ailman/listinfo/oldtools>
> > 
> > To read the FAQ:
> > https://swingleydev.com/a
rchive/faq.html <https://
swingleydev.com/archive/faq.html>
> > 
> > > OldTools archive: https://swingleyde
v.com/ot/ <https://swingleydev.com/ot/
>
> > 
> > OldTools@s... 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
> 
> To change your subscription options:
> https://o
ldtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools <https://oldtools.swingleydev.com/mai
lman/listinfo/oldtools>
> 
> To read the FAQ:
> https://swingleydev.com/arc
hive/faq.html <https://sw
ingleydev.com/archive/faq.html>
> 
> > OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.
com/ot/ <https://swingleydev.com/ot/>
> 
> OldTools@s... 



------------------------------

Message: 10
Date: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 14:25:00 -0500
From: Mike Rock 
To: oldtools@s...
Subject: Re: [OldTools] Can't resist old scissors
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed

Scott,
With just a bit of work your prose would turn into a fine Dr. Seuss bit 
of rhyming....
Only have about twenty scissors/scheers.? Love them!

On 10/11/2018 1:24 PM, scott grandstaff wrote:
> OMG you are so brave Bill!!
>
> ??? I secretly know I may be the worst, but was always shy about 
> confessing it. haahah
>
> Upstairs, downstairs, outside in the sheds,
> ?pegs and racks,........ but drawers hide them best. ;)
>
> ?From the teensiest "hangnail" shears (I had to grind my own I don't 
> think anyone ever made them)
> To big un's!! Paperhanger shears with 16" blades and tailor shears 
> that weight 4 pounds, roaching shears where the whole shear is curved 
> into an arc.
> ? Only ones I never had a chance at and wanted. Bench shears 4' long!
>
> ? All of the greatest collections were founded on what few people 
> wanted at the time.
> Collecting what everyone else already wants, is suicide.
> ??? yours scott
>
>



------------------------------

Subject: Digest Footer

------------------------------------------------------------------------
OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of handtool
aficionados, both users and collectors, to discuss the usage, history,
value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.

To change your subscription options:
https://old
tools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

To read the FAQ, go to:
https://swingleydev.com/archi
ve/faq.html

OldTools Archive: https://swingleydev.com/
ot/

OldTools@s...


------------------------------

End of OldTools Digest, Vol 158, Issue 12
*****************************************

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